Reblogged from nevver|1,161 notes

nevver:

Brooklyn

My neighborhood! See also: my shot here.

I spotted Louis CK and his daughter walking towards and past me on Broadway but because I am otherwise only passively aware of his existence I had assumed the blonde girls on the show were his actual daughters, so I had this sort of “ok mayyyybe that’s not him?” stretch of speculative staring because he was walking with a child who had red hair. Anyway, google image search confirmed for me.

Maybe I’m in a bubble, but that does not describe any generational peers I know, but definitely described the majority of baby boomers I know or have encountered.

Reblogged from the--kel--smith|37 notes

Dr. Shimi Kang

May is 30x30 month. A challenge to get people outside and interacting with nature for 30 minutes for 30 days.

(via tank-commander) While the weather could force some creativity - I like this challenge! (via the—kel—smith)

Same to be said about Baby Boomers, y/n?

Recent studies show that Generation Y (the cohort born after 1980) ranked values such as community involvement and self-acceptance much lower than wealth attainment, personal image and fame. These young people — also sometimes called Millennials, Gen Me, or Gen Entitled— are less willing to donate to charity, protect the environment, or get involved in social causes. These statistics demonstrate that children are becoming disconnected from nature and adopting an unbalanced perception of the world.

Hi, perfect Manhattan morning!

Hi, perfect Manhattan morning!

On Friday I completed my 4th week at the new job. Along with the preceding weeks, it was pretty hectic…

Week 1: Peter cut work down to Tuesday/Thursday but upped those days to 12-hour shifts. I did home office hours Tuesday and Thursday, and his brother helped out with kiddo.

Week 2: By Thursday it was obvious that everyone would be happier if Peter fully quit his job, and on Friday he gave his notice.

Week 3: Through work I was offered a spot in a 10-week M/W evening course relevant to the role for which I’m apprenticing.

Week 4: said evening course began, and on Thursday Peter worked his final 12-hour shift. What a week! I threw together a “retirement package” for Peter even though we all know this move is far from retirement. And here it is Monday, week 5. Work and class. So, so awesome.

I looked forward to this time since pregnancy, and my expectations (which were dangerous to have had and revolved mostly around being back to work with an awesome team and relied on having a chill, active toddler) are beyond met. When February became March, I was edging on a depressive dip due to said grand expectations, so *whew* for managing to have dodged that round.

Reblogged from covenesque|1,984 notes

here’s another source.

ETA: i’m going to affix my second post here, because this has gone a little viral, without the best sources. bear in mind, my initial discussion of this topic began as a response to props for the denny’s tweet about coachella and its implied wrongs of cultural appropriation.

i did ask everyone to complete further research. thus far, i’m seeing reblogs, but no further comments. c’mon, now. like certain agencies and news outlets, i withheld pertinent information about this case, hoping you jovenes would go find it. no? seriously? why not.

okay. did you find the fact that the head of the DOJ’s civil right’s division, deval l. patrick, remarked at the time, that this was the largest and broadest settlement ever paid under federal public accommodation laws? those were federal laws—not state statutes—enacted over 70 years ago, now, to end segregation in restaurants and other public places serving the public.

so, what actually happened, to bring denny’s to the attention of the DOJ’s civil rights division (and: did you know the DOJ has a civil rights division, with various branches, including housing?). 

majority of the claims came from black customers. this included a black federal judge from houston, traveling with his wife, who was forced to wait nearly an hour—while white patrons were served, and white teens taunted the black couple with the word “n*****.” no one from the staff did a damned thing.

one of the first complaints came in 1991 from a group of 18 young black men, who were asked to pay before service, at a denny’s in san jose, california. the men complied—but they also filed a suit against denny’s.

in 1993 (some articles have the date wrong), uniformed members of president clinton’s u.s. secret service were refused service in Annapolis, by a white waitress, because they were black; meanwhile their white secret service counterparts were seated and served. the black agents filed a complaintand one denny’s corporate public relations offices obviously couldn’t ignore.

1997 saw the rabid beatings of 6 Asian American students from syracuse university. after the standard treatment of denny’s “wait while we serve the whites,” the students complained to the management and their server, so were forced to leave the restaurant by security called by the manager. the students stated a group of white men then emerged from the restaurant and attacked them while shouting racial slurs. several of the asian students were left unconscious

what denny’s paid was a class action lawsuit for racial discrimination. claims proven during that case were settled, by any person of color (called a “minority,” in the suit). the overwhelming majority of those who had proven claims were black customers. denny’s clearly had an overall agenda upholding white supremacy.

ironically (and sadly), after the $54.4 million settlement, the restaurant chain went all out to win back its percentage of people of color—especially its former 10% black customer base. their public relations department featured sherman hemsley and isabel sanford, in one television commercialFortune magazine selected denny’s as “best company for minorities” in 2001; Black Enterprise gave top space for the chain in their “best companies for diversity,” in 2006 and 2007. read more about the effects of denny’s “grand slam” advertising, by doing some research. seriously *s

now consider why denny’s has its public relations department sending out these bold "calling out" messages, that manage to "raise awareness" about cultural appropriation. even for some of us who are critical of the tweets, there’s the thought that, “it’s not a bad idea.” well, it worked, didn’t it? mm.

c/s

~canéla

(via floricanto-desnuda)

yes, denny’s lost a $54 million law suit for being anti-black.

Reblogged from liannakristine|809 notes

I don’t really believe in cars, but I drive one every day and I love that it gets me places and makes life so much easier and faster and I don’t know what I would do without it.

Reblogged from humansofnewyork|16,386 notes

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

Uhhh wow, did not expect that! Would’ve been 100% normal if the sentence stopped at “died” or even “do.”

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?""Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

Uhhh wow, did not expect that! Would’ve been 100% normal if the sentence stopped at “died” or  even “do.”

Reblogged from kateoplis|640 notes

kateoplis:

1905

I see the present-day view many days a week now. This first spooked me, and then I thought someone took creative liberties with Photoshop. Weekend brain!

kateoplis:

1905

I see the present-day view many days a week now. This first spooked me, and then I thought someone took creative liberties with Photoshop. Weekend brain!

Reblogged from liannakristine|53,265 notes

Jeanne Ray (via shetakesflight)

Feeling this. I engineer my entire order backwards based on a preliminary glance at the desserts before ordering drinks, to make sure I can finish everything.

(Source: the-healing-nest)

Cakes have gotten a bad rap. People equate virtue with turning down dessert. There is always one person at the table who holds up her hand when I serve the cake. No, really, I couldn’t she says, and then gives her flat stomach a conspiratorial little pat. Everyone who is pressing a fork into that first tender layer looks at the person who declined the plate, and they all think, That person is better than I am. That person has discipline. But that isn’t a person with discipline; that is a person who has completely lost touch with joy. A slice of cake never made anybody fat. You don’t eat the whole cake. You don’t eat a cake every day of your life. You take the cake when it is offered because the cake is delicious. You have a slice of cake and what it reminds you of is someplace that’s safe, uncomplicated, without stress. A cake is a party, a birthday, a wedding. A cake is what’s served on the happiest days of your life. This is a story of how my life was saved by cake, so, of course, if sides are to be taken, I will always take the side of cake.

Reblogged from nevver|7,259 notes

Taking the train? Be sure not to take it to the face.

Taking the train? Be sure not to take it to the face.

Reblogged from littledidiknow|11,210 notes

littledidiknow:

Spirit animal

(Source: flowergrowedwild)

littledidiknow:

Spirit animal

Kiddo grabbed the near-empty dressing from the fridge door, scurried to drop it in the recycling bin, retrieved it and the empty OJ container, and returned to organize the fridge in such a way.

Kiddo grabbed the near-empty dressing from the fridge door, scurried to drop it in the recycling bin, retrieved it and the empty OJ container, and returned to organize the fridge in such a way.